Politics / 06.03.2016

By Anjum Altaf Speak (After Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s Bol) Now is the time to speak Lips not sealed Body unbroken Blood coursing still Through your veins Now is the time to speak Look The iron glows red Like your blood The chain lies open Like your lips Now is the time to speak Speak For the tide of life runs out Speak For truth and honor shall not wait Speak Say all that needs be said this day Faiz Ahmed Faiz's poem can be accessed in Urdu, Hindi and Roman here. Back to Main Page...

Politics / 05.03.2016

By Anjum Altaf For the Students and Faculty of JNU (After Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s dar-e umiid ke daryuuza-gar) Cursing, hurling vile abuse They came to tarnish, ravish, debase Parade the tatters of our soul As emblems of their rule Hordes swarm the streets Goose-stepping, flaunting steel Threatening, intimidating those Who dare refuse to keel We collect the shreds they tore Dyed red in our blood Sew them back in a banner Bigger, brighter than before Faiz’s poem can be accessed in Urdu, Hindi, and Roman here. Back to Main Page...

Analysis / 23.02.2016

I admire Dr. Nergis Mavalvala as much as the next person. Anyone with a similar track record and set of accomplishments deserves to be admired. What I find incongruous is the Pakistani media taking ownership of those accomplishments simply because she was born and educated up to high school in Pakistan. There are so many ironies here that it is painful to even point them out. To start with, Dr. Mavalvala has given up Pakistan – by her own admission she has not visited Pakistan much in the last thirty years since she left after high school. No blame is to be attached to her on that account – if she wanted to be and progress as an astrophysicist, she could not have done so in Pakistan. But beyond that, there was really no reason for her to visit Pakistan since most of her immediate and extended...

Politics / 19.02.2016

By Anjum Altaf The ongoing row at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) reminded me of the following statement by Vir Sanghvi: “the gap between Indians and Pakistanis has now widened to the extent that we are no longer the same people in any significant sense” (The same people? Surely not). I am not convinced of this claim and believe that the underlying social and attitudinal propensities in both countries (towards violence, religion, and nationalism, for example) remain fairly alike. It is only accidents of time and place that lead to seemingly differing outcomes in the emergent landscapes. I explored this argument earlier in a couple of posts (How Not to Write History and Pakistanization of India?) and the response to the recent events at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) strengthens my conviction further. Despite its very different political trajectory, India is repeating the patterns observed in Pakistan albeit with a...